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8 Business English Terms You Can’t Live Without! – Part 2

This is part two of our business English terms you can’t live without. Your business English journey will include many side roads – terminology specific to your field of expertise. However these terms, along with part 1, will ensure you stay on the path to comprehension and communication success.

LEVERAGE

Though “leverage” is another word that’s meant to be a noun – meaning the use of a lever to apply force – it’s often heard in a business context being used as a verb, meaning to utilise something to the business’s advantage.

Example:

“We should leverage our experience to attract older buyers.”

FEEDBACK

This term should be used as a noun to describe constructive comments about something.

Example:

“I’m grateful for the helpful feedback as it showed me how I can improve.”

PRICE POINT

In the world of business, especially retail, people like to talk about “price points” instead of just “prices”. This is an example of using more complicated language in lieu of a simpler word or phrase.

Example:

“The company produces motorbikes at a number of price points.”

ON THE SAME PAGE

If you’re “on the same page” as someone, you’re approaching something from the same point of view as them, with the same agreed assumptions in mind.

Example:

“Thank you for your input in the meeting, I think we’re on the same page.”

TOUCH BASE

This term has traveled from the pitches of American baseball into the offices of Australia. All it means in the office environment is “to make contact”. You might hear “let’s touch base”, meaning “let’s talk”.

Example:

“Can we touch base later this week to see how the project is progressing?”

BEST PRACTICE

You might hear colleagues referring to industry “best practice”, which describes a generally acknowledged ‘best way of doing things’ in order to achieve optimum results.

Example:

“The owners are keen to ensure best practice in food preparation, storage, and serving”

SKILL SET

This refers to someone’s range of skills. It’s jargon as it describes what could easily be referred to simply as “skills”.

Example:

“He doesn’t have the proper skill set to be an effective manager.”

ASAP

 “ASAP” is an acronym for “as soon as possible.” It can be said as a word, rather than sounding out the letters as is the case for some other acronyms.

Example:

“I need to finish these two reports; my boss wants them ASAP.”

Here at ESL Tutoring, we are the business English experts, we understand your business needs. Let us know what you need, elizabeth@esltutoringservices.com or 0402 316 391. We come to you face to face or online in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth.

See Part 1 of this series – https://esltutoringservices.com/esl-tutoring-business-english-8-terms-you-cant-live-without/

Check out https://esltutoringservices.com/business-english/ for more information.